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A Logo design disaster!

There are so many tips and tricks on how to design the best-looking logo, but what if you were to switch it around?

What if, instead of focusing on the perfect logo, you deliberately aimed to create the worst logo possible?










This may sound counterintuitive, but it’s a powerful exercise.


This technique is known as “inverted thinking.”


It’s a creative problem-solving strategy where you identify ways to achieve the exact opposite of your goal.


This will then allow you to better understand the principles that contribute to good design!


So, instead of thinking, “How can I make this design great?” ask the question, “What would make this design really bad?”


So, let’s put it to action with 10 surefire ways to design your worst logo ever (which may help you see things a little more clearly):


Tip #1: Poor Hierarchy

To ensure your logo is not instantly recognisable, throw in a variety of different elements. Mix fonts, symbols, and random shapes to create a chaotic mess. The more cluttered, the better! This is a perfect way to generate confusion.


Tip #2: Lack of Scalability

Who cares if your logo doesn’t look good at different sizes? Scalability is for amateurs. Ignore how your design appears as a favicon or on a billboard. Whether it’s a microscopic smudge or an incomprehensible blob, scalability is overrated.

Tip #3: Over Customise

Pick a font and grab the pencil tool. Go wild with flourishes, swirls, and unnecessary details (that have no meaning to the brand). Clients pay for custom logos, so why should legibility be a priority? The more intricate and customised, the better!

Tip #4: Make it Obvious

Embrace clichés with open arms. For a café, design a logo featuring a coffee cup, steam, and maybe even a muffin for good measure. Who needs originality when you can be blatantly obvious? This will make sure everyone immediately knows what the business offers, leaving no room for imagination or intrigue.

Tip #5: Add More Colours than you think

Forget the wisdom of established brands that stick to a simple colour palette. Go all out with as many colours as possible. Bright neon green with deep red, alongside electric blue and hot pink. The goal is to grab attention. Subtlety is boring! (Having 10+ colours makes it even better)!!!

Tip #6: Follow Trends

Ignore timeless design principles and jump on every fleeting trend. If minimalism is in, go for it. If gradients are hot next week, switch it up. Trend-hopping ensures your logo looks dated almost immediately, keeping it relevant for about five minutes.

Tip #7: Make It Extremely Detailed

Incorporate intricate illustrations and photographic elements. A logo should tell a story, right? Why not include an entire novel’s worth of imagery in one small space? The busier, the better! Fill every inch with detail, leaving no white space for the eye to rest.

Tip #8: Overuse Effects

Go crazy with drop shadows, bevels, embossing, and other effects. Layer them on until your logo is a gaudy mess. It’s not about subtlety, instead show off every tool in your design software. There’t not a chance your client will ask you ‘to make it pop’ with what you create!!

Tip #9: Ignore Feedback

Do what you want when it comes to designing logos. You know best! Ignore feedback from your clients. Your vision is perfect as it is (even if it doesn't match your clients vision).

Tip #10: Copy Competitors

Why bother coming up with something original when you can just copy your competitors? Mimic their designs closely, changing just enough to avoid legal trouble. This will make your logo blend in with the industry, ensuring it never stands out. There you have it, 10 ways to design your worst logo yet.

Follow these tips to create a logo that’s confusing, cluttered, and sure to leave a lasting negative impression.

If you could add one extra tip onto this list, what would it be? 👀 Hit reply and let me know!

P.S If you want to learn 6 crucial laws of logo design that I follow, I created a video you can watch here.

Chat next week,

Abi 😊

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